Burton Chopper Toy Story Snowboard

Author – J Rhodes

Shredding To Infinity and Beyond

We know, we know, it’s about time. It’s time for us at FamilyShred to finally submit our review on the Burton Chopper Toy Story edition. We’ve had a ton of requests, so the awaited moment has arrived. Enjoy.

The Burton Chopper is undoubtedly the classic no-brainer deck to choose for your child that is just learning how to snowboard. I will certainly get into some of the technology (yes, there is technology in entry level snowboards), but if you want the cut-to-the-chase answer of a great deck to buy for your future pro and don’t want to waste any more of your time, skip this article, drive to your local Burton dealer and pick one up. For the rest of you that amazingly have more time on their hands than most parents out there, high five, and read on.

I would like to preface by saying that no other snowboard company provides as much resource for the beginner rider as Burton. Whether it’s designing mini parks for 3-10 year olds, a full on Academy experience for all ages, integrating their philosophy of learning to ride with ski resorts’ instructor programs, or designing boards, boots, and bindings to decrease the steepness of the initial learning curve of snowboarding, Burton has your back to give you the best chance of success to become a snowboarder. Go browse Burton’s site and your mind will be blown at the resources available, especially in contrast to most of our own humble beginnings in snowboarding. It’s not exactly deciding whether your Jordans or your Sorels will give you more support on your plastic K-Mart board. Remember? That being said, the Burton Chopper is the ideal snowboard for your little grom to learn to snowboard on, and here’s why.

The camber profile: Unquestionably, a flat snowboard with rocker in the tip and tail is the easiest profile to learn to snowboard on. Simply said, camber is too catchy, rocker between the bindings is too loose. Hence, what Burton calls “Flat Top.”

Flex: Ultra forgiving. Enough said. Novices do not need performance. The first time you hold a Chopper, go ahead and grab the tip and tail with each hand, torsionally flex the board, and you’ll see how easy it will be for your child to control their ride instead of vice versa.

These two characteristics alone make it a phenomenal beginner board, but our East Coast friends don’t stop there. With tech called “Easy Ride” they actually lift the side edges up off of the ground. The advantage? Your young rider can engage the edge when he or she wants to, not at random unexpected times. What Burton calls “Easy Ride” think of as “Anti-scorpion technology.” By far the worst part of learning how to snowboard is catching your edge unexpectedly. That sole experience is surely what prevents a handful of first time riders from going back for their second day.

You know what else is awesome when you’re learning to snowboard? Learning both ways. I sure wish I had learned to ride switch from the beginning. It’s a good thing Burton makes this ride a 100% true twin. What else is great? How about not having to cash in your 401(k) to afford one for your kid? With an incredibly simple core and an extruded base Burton cuts out the frills to offer this ‘everything you need and nothing you don’t’ deck at an incredibly affordable price.

I am a huge sucker for rad collaborations, and this one is no exception. Last year Burton offered a Star Wars collab which was great for the dads and collectors out there, but it turns out that more children connect with Woody and Buzz Lightyear than R2-D2 and Darth Vader. Say what you will about what the world has come to, but it’s nice to be able to have your kid instantly connect to their ride instead of you trying to explain how effective this board’s camber profile will be in decreasing the steepness of the average snowboarder’s learning curve. Know what I mean?

Before I wrap up, there is a tiny little soapbox that I would like to stand on and say something to you. THERE IS NO REASON YOUR KID NEEDS TO LEARN TO SKI BEFORE HE OR SHE SNOWBOARDS. Thank you, that will be all.

Seriously, if your kid wants to snowboard they will likely progress faster at what inspires them than a sport that he or she is being forced into. And if you’re concerned that you yourself ski and don’t snowboard, well, you’re in luck because there is a children’s snowboard instructor standing right next to the children’s ski instructor that is surviving on ramen and Clif Bars and living with 10 people in a 2 bedroom apartment just so he can follow his passion of teaching kids to snowboard (and getting to shred everyday). So you’re in good hands. Years ago Burton had a slogan they printed on their youth equipment packaging that read, ‘Starting kids on skis is child abuse.’ I think you get the idea.

Rant aside and back to the point, the Burton Chopper has been intentionally designed for the first 2 years of your child’s snowboard career. If your little princess doesn’t care for the Toy Story theme and needs something more girly, then look to the Chicklet which is identical to the Chopper. Pair this board with the Grom binding (the easiest binding of all time to get in and out) and the Grom boot, both by Burton, and you will quickly find yourself in the running for Parent of the Year.

Sizes

80 cm

90 cm

100 cm

110 cm

115 cm

120 cm

125 cm

130 cm

Order from one of our affiliates and help out FamilyShred!
Burton Chopper Toy Story Snowboard 100 regularly 199.95 on sale 139.95
Burton Chopper Toy Story Snowboard – Kids’ regularly 199.95 on sale 119.97
Burton Chopper Toy Story Snowboard – Kids’ regularly 199.95 on sale 119.97
Burton Chopper Toy Story Snowboard – Kids’ regularly 199.95 on sale 119.97
Burton Chopper Toy Story Snowboard – Junior’s – 2012/2013 regularly 179.95 on sale 107.95

 

Kyah, BEST MINI GROM WINNER in our video contest is shredding up here on her Burton Chopper…

 

 

Links

Burton

Burton Experience Snowboarding

Burton Academy

 

 

 

 

 

 

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